Mon. Nov 28th, 2022

Are you looking for the best lower chest workout? Look no further! This article will discuss the best exercises for the lower chest and provide a workout routine to help you achieve impressive results. The lower chest is a neglected muscle group for many people. However, targeting this area is essential to achieving a well-rounded and balanced physique.

Decline,Smith,Machine,Bench,Press.,3d,Illustration. Lower Chest Workout
Decline Smith Machine Bench Press. 3D illustration

The lower chest comprises the clavicular and sternal head of the pectoralis major. This muscle group can be challenging to develop, but you can achieve impressive results with the right exercises and workout routine.

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The best exercises for the lower chest target the muscles of the lower pectoral region by pressing the weight in the opposite direction away from the lower chest. These include declining bench press, chest fly, low cable crossovers, pushups, and dips.

The Best Workout Routine for the Lower Chest is:

1) Decline Bench Press – 3 sets of 8-10 reps

2) Decline Chest Fly – 3 sets of 8-10 reps

3) Low Cable Crossovers – 3 sets of 10-12 reps

4) Pushups or Dips – 3 sets to failure

How to Perform the Best Lower Chest Workout

Decline Bench Press – Lie flat on a decline bench with your feet on the floor. Hold a barbell with your palms facing upward. Extend your arms straight above your chest and slowly lower the weights to your chest. Pause briefly, and then press the weights back to the starting position.

Decline Chest Fly – lie on a decline bench with your feet on the floor. Hold a dumbbell in each hand with your palms facing forward. Pull the weight above and to the center of your chest and slowly lower the weight back down and away from your chest. Pause briefly, and repeat.

Low Cable Crossovers – attach a stirrup handle to the low pulley of a cable crossover machine. Position yourself in the middle of the machine with your hands parallel. Step forward and pull the handles to your chest, maintaining a straight back. Pause briefly and then slowly return to the starting position.

Pushups or Dips – position yourself on the floor in a pushup position with your hands slightly wider than shoulder-width apart. Next, lower your body to the floor and press yourself back to the starting position.

If you select the dip, grab the bars or rest both hands on a bench or floor. Then lower yourself down until your triceps are parallel to the floor. Next, pause and slowly press back up. Always focus on form with pushups and dips. Both can injure your shoulders.

You should perform the best lower chest workout three times per week on non-consecutive days. Perform each exercise for three sets of 8-12 reps, except pushups, in which you should do three sets to failure.

The Last Word on the Best Loser Chest Workout

The best time to perform this workout is at the beginning of your training session or after you have completed all your other exercises. Be sure to focus on quality over quantity and rest between sets to allow your muscles to recover. Also, don’t forget to use progressive overload and periodization to see the best results during your bodybuilding journey.

Finally, the chest is a push muscle and responds better when you force the weight to move in the opposite direction of the muscle. Thus, pushing the weight up away from the lower chest will give you the best results.

Most pushing exercises will work the entire chest as a primary or secondary muscle. So add some exercises that work the chest or upper chest into your workout.

Now that you know the best exercise and workout routines for the lower chest, it’s time to start! What are your thoughts? Please respond in the comment section below.

By Terry Clark

Terry Clark is a math professor, certified fitness trainer, bodybuilding coach, nutrition specialist, writer, and fitness enthusiast. Terry loves working out, playing with numbers, solving problems, writing, and teaching.