Mon. Nov 28th, 2022

Do you want to know how to use your BMR to reach your fitness goals faster? Your basal metabolic rate (BMR) is the number of calories your body burns at rest. Also, it is the foundation for any fitness goals as it determines how well your body uses energy.

You can use several formulas to calculate your BMR, such as the Harris-Benedict equation or the St. Jeor Mifflin equation. In addition, some online calculators will do the math for you. Finally, you can calculate your BMR by tracking your diet and weight.

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How activities affect the metabolism. BMR Fitness Goal

What determines a BMR?

Many factors determine your BMR. These include:

  • Age: The basic metabolic rate declines with age.
  • Weight: Heavier people have a higher BMR than thinner people.
  • Muscle mass: People with more muscle mass have a higher BMR than those with less muscle mass. Also, this is because muscles require more energy to maintain than fat.
  • Gender: Men usually have a higher BMR than women. Also, this is because men have more muscle mass and less body fat than women.
  • Organs: The heart, kidneys, liver, and brain account for 51% of your BMR, accounting for only 6% of your body mass. When these organs are healthy, they need more calories to stay active. Thus, a healthy metabolism shows a healthy and fit body.
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How Do You Increase a BMR?

You can increase your basal metabolic rate through:

  1. Exercise: Exercise is the most efficient way to increase your BMR. As you exercise, your body needs more energy to maintain your muscles. Also, this increases BMR even after you stop working out. Resistance training is the best exercise to increase your basal metabolic rate.
  2. Diet: You can also increase your BMR by eating certain foods. Foods high in protein and low in fat help increase your BMR. Also, healthy foods that improve your circulatory and digestive systems increase your BMR. Foods high in fiber, like oatmeal and black beans, are great for your health and metabolism.
  3. Supplements: Some supplements claim to increase your BMR. However, there is no scientific evidence to support these claims. Any supplement that speeds up the heart or makes you more alert can temporarily increase your metabolism. Caffeine can do both, which is why many supplements that claim to increase your metabolism also contain caffeine.

Why is a Basal Metabolic Rate Important?

Basal metabolic rate is essential for two reasons. First, it can help you estimate the calories you need to maintain your current weight. Second, it can help you determine how many calories you need to eat to lose or gain weight.

calculating calories, calories burned, deficit, and weight loss calculator

How Do You Calculate a BMR?

There are a few different formulas that you can use to calculate your BMR. The Harris-Benedict equation and the St. Jeor Mifflin equation are the most common.

The Harris-Benedict Equation:

For Men: BMR = 66 + (13.7 x weight in kg) + (5 x height in cm) – (6.8 x age in years)

For Women: BMR = 655 + (9.6 x weight in kg) + (1.8 x height in cm) – (4.7 x age in years)

The St. Jeor Mifflin Equation:

For Men: BMR = (10 x weight in kg) + (6.25 x height in cm) – (5 x age in years) + 5

For Women: BMR = (10 x weight in kg) + (6.25 x height in cm) – (5 x age in years) – 161

BMR Calculator:

There are also many online BMR calculators to calculate your basal metabolic rate. However, basal metabolic rate calculators are only accurate if your input information is accurate. For example, if you input your weight in pounds instead of kilograms, the calculator will not be accurate. The best way to ensure you are using an accurate calculator is to use one that provides instructions on entering data into it.

Food Diary and Weight Scale:

Calculators and formulas determine your basal metabolic rate based on averages. But some people underperform or outperform averages. So if you are one of these people, then BMR calculators and formulas may not be for you. We all know people who can eat anything and don’t gain weight, and then others look at food and gain too much weight.

You can use your food diary to determine your metabolism by tracking your calories and weight. To do this, you must track your diet calories and weight without exercising. If you maintain weight from your diet without exercising, your calories are the same as your metabolism. Therefore, you can eventually determine your metabolism by adjusting your diet up or down to maintain your weight.

How the metabolism works. BMR Fitness Goal

How to Use Your Basal Metabolic Rate?

Now that you know how to calculate your BMR and what factors influence it, you can use it to help you reach your fitness goals. For example, if you want to maintain your current weight, eating the number of calories equals your BMR. If you lose weight, eat fewer calories than your BMR. And if you want to gain weight, eat more calories than your BMR.

The Last Word on How to Use Your BMR to Best Reach any Fitness Goal

Most people who diet regularly know how many calories they need to eat to lose or gain weight. You should know the range it takes to maintain, lose, or gain weight. To do this, you need to track your calories for a while.

Once you understand how your body uses energy, you must determine your BMI (body mass index). We closely relate BMR and BMI because vital organs account for over 50% of the metabolism, and BMI is an indicator of mortality. Thus, the BMR causes the BMI. While one shows how you use energy, the other shows how you store energy. But they both determine a healthy and fit body.

Use BMR and BMI calculators to set goals based on averages. But try to outperform those averages to improve your health and fitness. Also, use a proper diet and 30 minutes of regular exercise, including progressive overload and a periodization plan. What do you think? Please share your response in the comments below.

By Terry Clark

Terry Clark is a math professor, certified fitness trainer, bodybuilding coach, nutrition specialist, writer, and fitness enthusiast. Terry loves working out, playing with numbers, solving problems, writing, and teaching.